Arrêt Cardiaque

Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine

 Impact of the conversion to a shockable rhythm from a non-shockable rhythm for patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

  1. CournoyerE. NotebaertS. CossetteJ. MorrisL. de MontignyD. RossL. Londei-LeducM. IsepponJ. ChaunyR. DaoustC. SokoloffE. PietteJ. PaquetY. LamarcheM. AlbertA. Denault

Journal: Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine / Volume 20 / Issue S1 / May 2018

Introduction: Patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with an initial shockable rhythm (ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation) have higher odds of survival than those suffering from non-shockable rhythm (asystole or pulseless electrical activity). Because of that prognostic significance, patients with an initial non-shockable rhythm are often not considered for advanced resuscitation therapies such as extracorporeal resuscitation. However, the prognostic significance of the conversion to a shockable rhythm from an initially non-shockable rhythm remains uncertain. This study aimed to determine the degree of association between the conversion (or not) of a non-shockable rhythm to a shockable rhythm and resuscitation outcomes in patients with OHCA. It was hypothesized that such a conversion would be associated with a higher survival to discharge. Methods:The present study used a registry of adult OHCA between 2010 and 2015 in Montreal, Canada. Adult patients with non-traumatic OHCA and an initial non-shockable rhythm were included. The primary outcome measure was survival to hospital discharge, and the secondary outcome measure was prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The associations of interest were evaluated with univariate logistic regressions and multivariate models controlling for demographic and clinical variables (e.g. age, gender, type of initial non-shockable rhythm, witnessed arrest, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Assuming a survival rate of 3% and 25% of the variability explained by the control variables, including more than 4580 patients would allow to detect an absolute difference of 4% in survival between both groups with a power of more than 90%. Results: A total of 4893 patients (2869 men and 2024 women) with a mean age of 70 years (standard deviation 17) were included, of whom 450 (9.2%) experienced a conversion to a shockable rhythm during the course of their prehospital resuscitation. Among all patients, 146 patients (3.0%) survived to discharge and 633 (12.9%) experienced prehospital ROSC. In the univariate models, there was no association between the conversion to a shockable rhythm and survival (odds ratio [OR] 1.14 [95% confidence interval {CI} 0.66-1.95]), but a significant assocation was observed with ROSC (OR 2.00 [95% CI 1.57-2.55], p<0.001). However, there was no independent association between the conversion to a shockable rhythm and survival (adjusted OR [AOR] 0.92 [95% CI 0.51-1.66], p=0.78) and prehospital ROSC (AOR 1.30 [95% CI 0.98-1.72], p=0.073).

Conclusion: There is no clinically significant association between the conversion to a shockable rhythm and resuscitation outcomes in patients suffering from OHCA. The initial rhythm remains a much better outcome predictor than subsequent rhythms and should be preferred when evaluating the eligibility for advanced resuscitation procedures.

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